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they never get to to see all in one place. >> go a lowe's or home depot, one of the big box stores, good luck. you're on your own. >> how did these two enter the seemingly saturated market of a complex, well established industry like bathroom remodeling. >> no one approached it from a system perspective. sometimes it takes someone from outside the industry to reinvent the industry. >> as outsiders they asked themselves how they could stream line a process where most of the suppliers and manufacturers don't know each other and almost never communicate. >> no one delivers your bathroom in a box. that's what we do. >> that's how they hit on bath in the box concept. they treated the whole bathroom as a single product rather than a collection of various widgets. by bundling everything together they streamlined the supply chain from the design sketch to a finished bathroom. >> the idea is to be able to think through in advance all the parts that go into that eco system. >> that's nice. all in there? >> vanity, tubs. >> a box with my whole bathroom in it. >> that homeowner is renovating her bathroom
and bill say that big manufacturers are starting to take notice of this new supply chain approach. they see it as an alternative drishs channel to the big box stores which control much of the industry. >> the manufacturers see bath simple as a way to open up a whole new channel for how they sell their product. they're stuck in the home depot, lowe's channel, it's a big channel, but a low margin, it's dangerous to have one big customer. we sell to the contractors out there and they get it very quickly. >> consumers, too, are taking notice. the online design software makes the selection process faster and easier than the traditional chore of running from store to store. >> i have three middle school kids. and i just don't have to time. this whole idea intrigued me with bath simple. that's how i got started with that. >> from the manufacturers to the contractors to the consumer to the retail chains they see this as a new way of doing something that's been done for a long time the old way. >> rethinking and reinventing an approach to a business can make you stand out from the crowd. let's turn
. >> robert, is this a function of -- in part it is. how big of a part of firms failing or firms not having the capital to grow versus technology? >> that's a very good question. actually, the raw numbers don't give an answer to it. all we can do is make guesses. the fact that the numbers started falling before the recession may mean that the new business sector was a canary in the coal mine saying the economy was going to slow down. i think once the recession hit it's pretty clear the difficulty of getting capital has got to be affecting a lot of firms. it may not affect firms doing business on the internet because they can go to the cloud. it's a lot easier and cheaper these days to use technology to start your business, but if you're having a, you know, a restaurant or any other business that's got capital and so forth, you can't do all of your business on the internet. so that capitalism, that's scarce due to the recession. >> i want to ask you, brad, you deal with a lot of new businesses. do you find people aren't growing as quickly as they were a few years ago? >> i think they will be
of people the mother company hopes to pay back. >> failure is not an option. we will be writing them a big check and i will say mother company! we did it. >> while ern might not be in a group of people where they have $1,000 to spare, there's something to be learned from this piece about going to people who understand your business. let's turn to this week's board of directors. we have the founder, president and ceo of count me in for women's economic independence. and larry chang is a managing partner at va ligs capital. >> great to be here. >> it's an interesting piece because both of you deal a lot with funding small companies. what i loved this woman turned down millions of dollars she was selling stuff on craig's list and turning down money at the same time. it turned tout be a great idea. >> love the fact she followed her i think stingts and said the professional investors are not for me. i'm going to find advocates for my company. >> a lot of people do this in maybe not organized a way as she has, it is angel funding it's friends and funding she had to look around for more friends a
policymakers who are making very bad decisions or no decisions at all. their big concern is the unstable policy climate will continue to put the roadblocks to allow the self-employed community to achieve and grow past this current economic climate. >> so how is that affecting the way they're running their businesses right now? >> everyone is running their business very hesitantly. they're very cautious about the decisions they make because so much is up in the air regarding policy whether it be tax policy, health policy. dealing with the national debt right now. balancing the budget. there's just a big concern about the regulatory environment. and they're cautious about the way they're growing and spending money. it's making it very difficult for people to get through the economic downturn. >> does it feel like it's different than it was a couple of years ago? >> it is. our members are saying that it's worse. that the political climate is so much more worse these days. that people are putting politicians over policy and making good decisions for our country. there's a big concern about the inst
the mother company hopes to pay back. >> failure is not an option. we will be writing them a big check, and i will say woo hoo! mother company! we did it! >> so while everyone might not be in a group of people where they all have an extra $10,000 to spare, there's definitely something to be learned from this piece about going to people who understand your business. let's turn to this week's board of directors. nell is the founder, president, and ceo of count me in for women's economic independence. and larry chang is a managing partner at volition capital. great to see both of you guys. >> great to be here. >> it's such an interesting piece because both of you deal a lot with funding small companies. what i loved is that this woman turned down millions of dollars. she was selling stuff on craigslist and turning down money at the same time, but it turned out to be a great idea. >> yeah. >> loved the fact that she followed her entrepreneurial instincts and said, you know what, these professional investors are not for me. i'm going to find real advocates for my product and company and went to pa
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6